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's path. usually bustling cities have been brought to a stand still. this is the scene in manhattan where a crane is dangling from a 65-story building. a monday m manhattan unlike any other. the city that's supposed to never sleep is eerily quiet, awaiting the storm. subway stopped. even wall street not trading. the -- >> we're used to coming down and the water calm, much, much slower. it's over the banks and the storm hasn't gotten here. it makes me nervous. >> the impact of hurricane sandy is starting to be felt. high winds and crashing waves along the east coast. >> good morning, america. breaking news on the halloween superstorm. >> morning tv shows left americans in in doubt the storm severity. >> 15 million people in its path. >> storm preparations take precedence over campaigning for next week's presidential election. mitt romney canceled his events for two days. barack obama returned to the white house. >> the center of the storm is going to hit landfall sometime this evening, but because of the nature of this storm, we are certain that this is going to be a slow-moving process th
. and millions on the east coast do not have electricity, and normally booming cities are at a standstill. 33 people have reportedly been killed. >> the destructive power of the super storm unleashed after dark as sandy made landfall. the flooding was instant, the scale shocking. the storm arrived with high tide in new york harbor, creating a surge of nearly 14 feet. subway tunnels flooded. the water engulfed the construction site at ground zero. manhattan was plunged into darkness. electricity generators and exploded in spectacular fashion. >> what is going on? i don't know what is going on. >> oh, my god. >> many cars were damaged by falling trees and high winds. >> 0, my god. my car. >> patients were evacuated from the hospital that lost power when its generator failed. >> in this huge blaze in queens and started in the aftermath of the flood. more than 80 houses were destroyed by the fire. incredibly, only a few people were injured. on staten island, the force that tossed a vote on shore. >> make no mistake about it, this was a devastating storm, maybe the worst we have ever experienced.
heating up, and one city's efforts to cool down. >> ifill: and ray suarez has the story of a mexican drug lord killed in a gunfight, and his corpse stolen from the funeral home. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: the former football coach who plunged penn state university into scandal by his sexual abuse of young boys over many years was sentenced today. the judge called his crime a "story of betrayal." jerry sandusky wore a red jail jump suit and a smile as he entered the center county courthouse this morning, less than two hours later, the smile was gone after th
people killed, and $20 billion or more in damage. the nation's most populous city and its surroundings were at the epicenter. new york is a city in shock today, even deserted in places after a night of fear, fire and floods. a record storm surge of 13 feet poured into parts of lower manhattan, brooklyn, and queens as sandy hit. the rush of water closed major commuter tunnels linking manhattan with otherboros contributing to the worst damage to the subway system in its 108 years. >> last night we could look down this street here and we saw the river coming toward us and it actually looked like something out of a movie. it was unbelievable. >> woodruff: equally unbelievable, winds of at least 80 miles an hour blew out the bright lights that usually dominate the manhattan skyline. some one million homes and businesses in and around the city lost power. today mayor michael bloomberg appealed for understanding amid warnings it could take days to restore all transit service and power. >> we have begun the work of clearing and reopening bridges and roadways both of which will take some time.
is one of the most swinging cities in the whole country, politically speaking, that is. we'll explain. >> ifill: the supreme court devoted its day to drug-sniffing dogs and privacy rights. we talk with marcia coyle of the national law journal. >> woodruff: and spencer michels looks at the complaints about apple's maps and the high stakes for those trying to come up with something better. >> the battle over digital map making indicates how crucial this field has become and it could bode well for consumers as the maps get better. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: the u.s. death toll from the giant storm named sandy has risen to at least 63 today. about 6.5 million homes and businesses are still without
. at the heart of the city, life is slowly returning to normal. new yorkers across the brooklyn bridge on a foot. michael bloomberg sounded a defiant first belt of a reopened stock exchange. the message from the mayor is that the big apple is open for business. that only tells part of the story. in the greater new york area, there is still many many homes without power. the subway network is shut down. this is the scene at one subway station where monday night the waters rose from track to ceiling. parts of the network will reopen tomorrow. this is a city that has survived or stand sandy. hear, all along on the eastern seaboard. questions to test those who would lead america. >> questions indeed. for the very latest, we can go to jane hill. as steve was reported, the city is starting to get back to life. i am not sure this will be a new york that we all know. >> no, it is a very peculiar feeling. we are very near battery park on the southern tip of manhattan. this is the battery under park, one of the seven main passes through the city. four out of seven of these tunnels are still full of water.
organization. the people's funeral service helps poor families when they lose a loved one in a city where everyday killing is a fact of life. [indistinct talking] >> another day, another death. a community struggles to understand the killing of a young man, just one of 20 people who meet a violent end every day in honduras. ramon orlando varela was gunned down the day before as he dropped his children off at school. [indistinct talking] he was just 26 years old. [horns honk] ramon's funeral has been funded by the people's funeral service, set up by the mayor of tegucigalpa. nilvia castillo is in charge. [speaking in spanish] >> and it's certainly in demand. in honduras, a toxic mix of guns, gangs, drugs, and corruption has engendered the highest homicide rate in the world--over 80 times that of most european countries. [indistinct talking] the shade is welcome under a tropical sun. but this is no picnic. it's the city's morgue. and all of these people are waiting for the body of a loved one to be released for burial. [speaking in spanish] johnny and his colleagues from the people's funera
're smarter than we are here. maybe they are. but not about this. >> ifill: in new york city officials shut down all transit services and ordered nearly 400,000 people to evacuate low-lying areas. hours before sandy hit, high water blew on to the board walk in battery park at the southern tip of manhattan. high winds also left a construction crane dangling from the top of a 55-story building. even the stock market closed due to weather for the first time in nearly 30 years. it will remain closed tomorrow. the nation's capital followed suit, shutting down public transportation, schools, and federal offices. president obama canceled a campaign rally in florida and flew back to washington, appearing early this afternoon to promise federal help. >> i'm extraordinarily grateful for the cooperation of our state and local officials. the conversations that i've had with all the governors indicate that at this point there are no unmet needs. i think everybody is taking this very seriously. we've got... prepositioned all the resources that we need. but right now the key is to make sure that the publi
a stark picture of what 24 hours is like in an inner-city pr -- e.r. we are glad you have joined us. a conversation with peter nicks coming up right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminate hunger, and we have a lot of work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: the issue of health care has been a constant conversation in this country over the past few years, amplified during this campaign season. behind the politics of health care is the reality of what many americans face, especially in inner cities. peter nicks decided to chronicle a day in a life of an open emergency room. the film is called "the waiting room" and is being called one of the best documentary projects of the year. it is playing in select cities across the country. here are s
. hurricane sandy brings the city that never sleeps to its knees, leaving millions without power. >> tom: i'm tom hudson. wall street is working on a comeback with plans to reopen stock trading tomorrow, despite heavy flooding in lower manhattan. >> susie: from crippled transportation throughout the northeast to canceled flights, the federal response and potential election impact. we'll have all that and more right here on nbr! >> tom: hurricane sandy is now super-storm sandy as it clashes with another weather system, bringing wind, rain, and snow to parts of the mid-atlantic and northeastern u.s. she has cut a path of destruction, flooding, and massive power outages as the death toll from the storm stands at 17 across seven states. even as sandy makes her way to canada, the destruction is devastating. high winds pushed the atlantic ocean up and over seawalls, flooding entire neighborhoods. the wind and water teamed up to cut power to millions of people along the eastern seaboard. the storm surge even continued today as sandy tracked through western pennsylvania and new york state. the stor
from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: orhan pamuk is here, the nobel prize winning author of "my name is red," "snow" and the museum of innocence" has just had another novel translated into english. "silent house" was written in turkish almost three decades ago. it is set in the summer of 1980 in the leader of turkey's coup. fatima is visited by her children. they enter into a deep darkness which is visible between the wings of the big front door. pamuk has also published "the innocence of objects," the catalog to the museum of innocence in istanbul which opened early this year. i am pleased to have this friend of our program back at this table. welcome. >> thank you. >> rose: we visited in istanbul, visitors are making us happy. everything is fine with the museum. >> rose: has everything changed in your life since i saw you? >> i returned back to my writerly persona. so in many so many programs i told you between the ages of seven and 22 i wanted to be a painter then. between 22 to now i'm writing novels but theead artist in me came out, i planned this nove
of history have marched through the streets. an ancient city that has been fought over many times before. today, aleppo is at war again. the further you edge into the old city, the sound and fury of battle grows. those who stayed behind must cheat death every day. a simple sign reads, do not cross, sniper to your left. seven or eight people were killed to last week, he says. the rebels have moved into the path of the old city. activist took us there. a world heritage site where the scars of battle run deep and the devastation is mounting. aleppo is a city under siege. the fighting is now street by street, house by house. the fighters have been calling for outside help for many months. for the first time, a strong indication they're getting it. the ukrainian weapons firms made the box and its contents for the royal saudi army. how would ended up in the roiled -- in a rebel base in aleppo is not clear. interests, both sides get help from abroad in a proxy war that threatens a fragile region. the atmosphere on the front line is incredibly tense and almost eerily quiet. you can hear the soun
, a provider of multimedia news and information services worldwide. from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: evan thomas is here, an author, a journalist and a professor at princeton. he has written on topics including robert kennedy, barack obama, the ci and wise men in his latest book he turns to president eisenhower, thomas sheds light on aspects of eisenhower's personality that have often been overlooked, he examines how the president's tactical skill informed his leadership and his foreign policy, the book is called ike's bluff, president eisenhower's secret battle to save the world, i am pleased to have evan thomas back at this table. welcome. >> charlie. >> rose: why do you call it ike's bluff? >> well, he was running a big bluff. he was bluffing with nuclear weapons. >> rose: meaning what? >> meaning ike's central insight was that he didn't want to fight any wars, not little wars, not immediate wars, he didn't want to fight any wars but the ways to avoi
to begin. the bomb went off in a crowded mainly christian district of the city. local tv stations were broadcasting images of burned out cars and images of wounded people. 8 people were killed and as many as 100 were injured. the main target was a brigadier general, the chief security official in lebanon. he had recently implicated syria and its lebanese allies, hezbollah, for the killing of the prime minister. he was a fierce critic of syria. this will create shockwaves in the entire region. after a long time of relative calm, this is the first big attack in four years. many feared something like this to happen sooner or later and that lebanon would be dragged into the conflict some political leaders have accused the assad regime in syria of being behind the attack. >> for more on the incident from of volatility out of the region, i spoke a brief time ago with a senior fellow at the washington institute for near east policy. does this bombing show the conflict has spread into lebanon? >> it has spread to the heart of beirut. it has been spreading for a couple of months, the border are
york area by monday. in the path of the storm: several of the nation's biggest cities, travel hubs and several major gasoline refineries along the new jersey and delaware coasts. financial centers like the nasdaq and new york stock exchange, say they'll have contingency plans in place. electronic trading is expected to continue as normal. michael barry says insurance companies are already mobilizing to deal with damage from hurricane sandy. he's vice president, with the insurance information institute. >> what are insurance companies doing to be prepared? >> well, right now they're trying to figure out exactly where this storm is going to make landfall. as indicated they have mobile catastrophe units sent to the scene so that the insurers can go out and cater to their policy holders, help them file claims after the storm hits. right now, the big question is where is this going to hit? i saw a modeling company saying delaware, maryland, virginia, and moving west into populated cities like philadelphia. >> susie: it's covering a wide swath of states, and we're hearing there will be h
california. joining me on our news panel tonight are barbara taylor, kcbs city hall reporter and scott shafer, host of the california report on kqed public radio. and carla marinucci, san francisco chronicle senior political writer. carla, there is so much going on in politics today. let's start with the vice presidential debate. people said they wanted action. what did they get? >> that's right. you could almost hear the cheers coming out of san francisco, the bars and so forth as it was going on this week. a slugfest, a political slugfest. this is what the democrats wanted to see. if joe biden had one job at this event, it was to pump up the base. he did that job this week after obama's disappointing debate. and we saw obama here this week. this was a very busy week in politics. and it is all about enthusiasm in the base in places like san francisco, northern california. if voters here on the democratic side are not enthusiastic about getting out there for obama, if he doesn't have -- if they don't have his back, he's got trouble in congressional races and fund-raising and everything else.
in the campaign. tonight's missing issue is europe's debt crisis. >> brown: an ancient and historic city at risk in a modern-day civil war. we look at the destruction in aleppo, syria. >> this is one of the great tragedies. aleppo's an extraordinary cross roads of cultures, religions, all built on a strata of centuries of -- >> woodruff: and ray suarez has the story of a 19th century recording made on tinfoil by thomas edison, digitally converted so we can hear it. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> computing surrounds us. sometimes it's obvious and sometimes it's very surprising in where you find it. soon, computing intelligence in unexpected places will change our lives in truly profound ways. technology can provide customized experiences tailored to individual consumer preferences, igniting a world of possibilities from the inside out. sponsoring tomorrow starts today. and the william and flora hewlett foundation, working to solve social and environmental problems at home and around the world. and with the ongoing supp
sales. it unveiled its much anticipated new operating system, windows 8, here in new york city, and showed off its new tablet, the surface. the operating system's key feature-- an ability to work across all computers: tablets, laptops and desktops. over one billion hours of testing time went into the new operating system and the surface tablet. c.e.o. steve ballmer calls them a milestone in computing. >> with windows 8, we've brought together the best of worlds-- the p.c. and the tablet; your work, life, and play. windows 8 will help you do everything, and it will make it a lot of fun, frankly, to do nothing. one device now combines the greatest qualities with the p.c. with the greatest qualities of the tablet experience. >> susie: joining us now with more on tablets, and those apple earnings, david garrity, head of his own tech research firm, gva research. david, you have been a real strong recommender of apple stock. any change in your thinking because of those earnings today and the disappointment? >> susie, no. for a couple simple reasons. first off, apple with their announ
the city. the result, a global climate change. >> as nothing else changes, the outlook looks pretty bad. the paper we just had published suggests that it was the same conditions over the next 10 years, we would see further reduction by half. remember, these changes are happening before the major impact of climate change kicks in. >> the government says they are spending hundreds of millions of dollars trying to protect the great barrier reef. the u.n. says that unless more is done, the reef risks losing its world heritage list davis. this would turn into a political and ecological disaster. it has just been stand by google. are these pictures about to go from being an up-to-date window on the "masterpiece to a collection for an archive? >> a thrilling sport tradition or a crow and antiquated form of entertainment? in mexico, the debate is raging on whether to ban bullfighting. >> it is still one of the most controversial past times in the americas. bullfighting has been practiced in mexico since the time of the conquistadores, but its days might now be numbered. last year, a proposed ba
that the war is intensifying. it is the northern city of aleppo that has seen some of the fiercest fighting. we have seen the terrible suffering at one of the hospitals in the city where doctors struggle to treat wounded patients. his report contains graphic images. >> this is serious descent into hell. a ruthless air campaign. and the carnage in it wreaks. a war between the state and an armed rebellion where even those that treat the victims are targeted. this hospital has been shelled 12 times. there are few facilities left now to treat the living. and so the bodies pile up outside. waiting to be collected. inside, the surgeon treaty 2- year-old. the scalp was torn open when a rocket landed on his house. in the next bed, the doctors struggled to try to keep them alive. these are now the only two beds left for the surgeons can operate. and with the threat of attack, the entire hospital has moved. every few minutes, more casualties, men. a grim procession of patients from different parts of the city. victims of a remorseless campaign of air strikes and artillery. the shows just landed in a neig
. in september, 2010, in new york city, the premier and china's economic czar said china keeps its currency low in order to give a trade advantage to its manufacturerrers. manufacturers. we should brand it as a currency manipulator. >> you heard the president say the currency has depreciated? >> i think it is a serious problem to brand them a currency manipulator. a lot of countries intervene to affect the value of their currency. japan has many times, and so has many others. we haven't branded any of them a currency manipulator ever. secondly, the chinese currency is what the market price would be. you see that reflected in china's current account balance. the bottom line is the current account balance is well within the standards that we, ourselves, have advocated, saying if it is within those standards it really is not a big problem. the obama administration has pressured china from the start on currency values. they are now close to the market rate. but the issue is two-fold: one, currency value is not, by any means, the biggest issue in u.s./china trade relations. so it diverts attention f
had to interact before because they had this city's separating them and they had to interact with the local law enforcement and local government. the local government is going, what is going on here? vegas was part of nevada and utah were mormon. the center of power used to be in salt lake city. it is still, to a degree. it was frowned upon. there was gambling and prostitution down there. with all this money, i think the folks up there when, hey, we should get our hands around this and get control of the situation. it made for strange bedfellows. really odd marriages of really different cultures in a way that we had not seen before. tavis: what are you learning so far about walking in the shoes of a wise guy, trying to go good? >> is really an interesting perspective. let's -- try to divorce yourself from me for a moment. this is part of my process. reading, talking to individuals, taking in information from whatever quarter i can find it. the attitude is, not speaking for myself, what separates me from law enforcement? nothing. they are just the people with the badges. they
. >> the breathtaking fall splendor of the rocky mountains. in his foothills sit the mile high city. the beating heart of a critical swing states, a state where women voters outnumber men by more than 100,000. >> my name is rebecca. i am a single mother with three teenage children. >> i am catherine. my husband is working two jobs while i stay home and take care of my 2-year-old daughter, charlotte. >> women on a budget come to this giant retailer for a no- frills convenience. the cards are used to have a corporate job. the right after she was born i was laid off we went from having a lot of money to not nearly as much money. >> bill clinton famous huizar -- famously targets of bombs. sarah palin rallied hockey mom spirit of the 2012 variation on that group could decide the outcome. that is because in elections wal-mart moms intend to make up their minds late. as rebecca cut back on spending, she wants a president who will do the same. >> we have to look at where our budget is. how do we fix it? how do we get it back on the right track? because it is a mess. >> at catherine's house it is breakfast tim
city. they build it back up. romney's whole history of a family is that they knocked us down, we built it back up. we didn't make a fortune; we made a bunch of fortunes. and they resented us for our success, but we kept coming back. that's romney's history. >> with someone with a name with romney you heard about the sufferings of your ancestors and their sacrifices and all they've done that you feel like, well, it's my turn now; i've got to pick up the baton and run with it. >> narrator: but mitt and his family rarely tell the story to outsiders. >> it's an incredible history. he can't talk about it because it involves polygamy. and so if the core of your personality is something you can't talk about because it's politically unacceptable, well, you're not going to be open with the people all around you. >> narrator: now the church was sending mitt away to spend two and half years on a mission in france. >> as mitt romney has said, imagine going to bordeaux and saying to people, "i've got a great new religion for you and, by the way, give up your wine." >> narrator: the task: to put on
winds pounded ocean city maryland and they said all along their biggest worry by far is flooding. >> this is what you get on the flip side of hurricane sandy, snow. >> and it hasn't stopped all night. >> the storm has caused the cancellation of 14,000 flights across the country. >> do we know how this storm may affect vote something. >> this is a frantic time for both campaigns to a pause is something they want to get over with fast. >> hopefully your thoughts and prayers will join with mine, to think about those folks who are in harm's way. a. great thing about america iss like this, we all stick together, the good news is we will clean up and we will get through this. >> we turn now to politics with mark halperin of time magazine, who is also the best selling author of game change. >> if this storm hadn't happened we would be seeing wall-to-wall coverage of one of the most exciting finishes to a presidential election in the television age. we are not going to see as much of that, certainly through the weekend. which means whichever candidate was going to benefit more from natio
of nowhere." it opens this weekend in new york, l.a., and other select cities. we're glad you joined us. a conversation with filmmaker ava duvernay coming up right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminating hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: ava duvernay became the first african-american woman to win best director at this year's sundance film festival. the movie is set in south l.a. and looks at the life of a woman whose husband is sentenced to eight years in prison. here are some scenes from "middle of nowhere." >> do not be marder. >> i am a wife. >> we will see each other every weekend. >> i do not want you to stop for me, baby. >> we're somewhere in between, in the middle place. >> he is a convicted felon. >> i am trying
. it is not all of damascus. it is one little area. not a whole city. >> but this place isn't shut off from the rest of the country. when serious uprising began some -- when syria's uprising began some 18 months ago, there are also uprisings in the square here, but they were forcefully put down. aside from occasional demonstrations or explosions since then, this remains one of the most peaceful areas in the whole country. authorities are determined to keep it that way because this region is too important to lose. it is the ancestral home of the assad's. they are a large minority in this city and they dominate the hills behind. by charlotte saw's father is buried in these hills. we were -- bashar al-assad's father is buried in these hills. we were given rare access. he died in 2000, as syria's all- powerful president. it is often his -- it is often said his son is under pressure to preserve his legacy. this town was quiet when we visited. since then, there have been reported clashes between leading families. a measure of growing unease over their place in syria's troubled future. this region
big cities and the darkness of the public mood. >> thank you. the debt crisis in europe and sluggish growth in the u.s. has had a huge impact on china. the country has seen a drop in demand for its exports. new figures show annual growth there has slipped to 7.4%. that is still an enviable rate compared to most of the world. our correspondent looks at china's toxic legacy. >> they call its -- on every street in every alley, they are making -- if you wear a pair, it was probably made a year. created jobs for millions. like all of china, this town was facing problems, slowing demand overseas, rising costs at home. smaller factories line the river banks, doing things cheaply has come to -- come at a cost. the water is tainted, a disgusting cocktail locals say is too politic to use. >> all along the river, abandoned factories. the polluted water from those places release mouse. >> china's next generation are about to take power here. they face two problems. how to keep the economy growing and also tackle rising discontent and the damage that has been done to the environment. a few weeks
people in america who are out of work, but still ahead, i'll introduce you to two new york city firms that can't hire workers fast enough. >> tom: the federal government made what it called one of the largest medicare fraud crackdowns today, arresting dozens of people across seven cities, accusing them of cheating medicare out of $430 million. today's busts involved 91 people, including doctors, nurses, and hospital administrators, including these arrests in miami. among the scams-- the president of riverside general hospital in houston and his son are accused of giving medicare patients food and cigarettes for claiming to get hospital care, but instead watched tv or played games. federal prosecutors said that scheme led to $158 million in fake bills. today's action, announced by the justice department, stretched from brooklyn to los angeles. >> this is something i think we see at a variety of levels. we see it among people who are health care professionals who take oaths to provide care and do no harm, and in fact they are doing great harm. we are going after people, whatever their p
"a", but some cities are experiencing even higher prices. for drivers, the good news is prices are expected to fall, but california remains vulnerable to quick price hikes. refinery and pipeline problems have put the squeeze on supplies and california drivers. >> well its pretty crazy. >> i think it sucks. big time i mean its terrible" >> the went up pretty high from last week." >> they just jump them up real quick and then it takes forever to get them back down again it is pretty ridiculous. >> tom: today's average price in the state, $4.67 a gallon for regular unleaded. that's $0.50 higher than a week ago. $0.86 higher than the national average. wholesale gas prices fell today after california governor jerry brown yesterday eased the state's gas-blend requirements. the change allows refiners to start processing a less- expensive winter fuel blend today, about three weeks ahead of schedule. california's strict air quality standards require a specific gasoline blend that's not necessary in other states, resulting in only a handful of refiners making it. the price spike came aft
activity in september expanded modestly since the last snapshot. only new york and kansas city saw a leveling off or slowing of growth. residential real estate was the one major sweet spot, showing widespread improvement. >> we've seen a pickup in house prices, we've seen a pickup in construction activity, a little bit better demand for loans. so, it generally corroborates what we've been seeing in the economic reports on the housing market. >> reporter: conditions in the manufacturing sector were mixed, but somewhat improved since the last reading. meanwhile, the job market was little changed since the last report, which was the released in august. that was a bit of a surprise, given the recent drop in the nation's unemployment rate. but, at least one economist says it suggests the lower jobless rate may not be sustainable. >> it doesn't appear that the labor market is really showing all that much fundamental improvement and that's not all that surprising given the uncertainty around the pending fiscal cliff at yearend, the upcoming election. >> reporter: today's new economic evid
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 135 (some duplicates have been removed)

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